My Current JavaScript Design Pattern

My Current JavaScript Design PatternWith every major JavaScript project, I’ve tried something new, improving on what I’ve written before. Currently, whenever I build something from scratch, I use a variation of what Addy Osmani and others commony refer to as the module pattern.

Here is my version below, which assumes jQuery, and then I’ll provide some explanation of what’s going on here and how I use it:

Diversity in Sports: Still an Issue in 2013?

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Girl in Blue Jays shirtA colleague today mentioned the 2013 Toronto Blue Jays — a much improved team compared to what was fielded in 2012. It’s owned and operated by Rogers Blue Jays baseball Partnership, a division of Rogers Communications

I opened up their website and scanned through it, quite excited by the upcoming season and the game schedule. It was only when I clicked through to their team roster that I saw this:

Simple Tools for Front-End Developers

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Front-End ToolsContinuing with the roundup and reading list theme this week, below is a list of tools that might be of interest to front-end developers.

As always, if you have a tool, book, or script you’d like to share, add it to the comments.

Links for Advanced JavaScript Reading

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Links for Advanced JavaScript ReadingDue to the lower traffic holiday week, and the fact that I’m busy with other stuff, this week’s posts will consist of reading lists and roundups.

Today the focus is on some heavier JavaScript stuff. Feel free to add any others in the comments.

USB Usability

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USB PlugNever forget that usability lessons can be learned from virtually anything you use. This concept has been discussed extensively in Don Norman’s famous book, and I thought I’d discuss something specific in this area in this post.

Last week I sent out a tweet regarding an annoyance with USB plugs.

Differences Between CSS2.1 and CSS3+

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W3C CSS SpecMost of us know that with the introduction of what we customarily call “CSS3”, there have been changes and additions to CSS, compared to what we had in CSS2.1.

Putting all cross-browser issues aside, I thought it would be nice to be able to document all these changes into a single post and keep it up to date.

So if you want a list of everything that’s been introduced into the CSS spec since CSS2.1, here it is.

New Book: HTML5 Boilerplate Web Development

HTML5 Boilerplate BookA couple of weeks ago Packt Publishing contacted me and gave me a free e-book version of Divya Manian’s new book HTML5 Boilerplate Web Development.

For a while now I’ve been wondering who was going to write a book on HTML5 Boilerplate. Although much of what’s in Boilerplate is “plug and play” (i.e., it just works, even if you don’t know what it does), I think many people are intimidated by it and would like a deeper understanding of what’s going on, and what is the optimal way to employ this popular framework. So a book on this topic is a great idea.

IDs Will Not Make Your Documents More Semantic

Stack of BooksBefore I get into the meat of this post, I’ll just provide some context. Last week, Harry Roberts posted a fantastic article discussing his view of bad CSS. In that article, as he’s done before, he disourages the use of IDs as selectors.

In response, Jeffrey Zeldman tried to defend the use of ID selectors. I posted a few comments in response to Jeffrey and another commenter, explaining why their views were wrong.

IE10 CSS Hacks

IE10 HacksLast year, Microsoft announced that IE10 will not be supporting conditional comments. With their history, this is obviously a risky move. Up to now, to target quirky behaviour in IE6-9, developers have been using conditional comments, conditional classes, and other IE-specific hacks.

But without conditional comments in IE10, the only options we’re left with to target CSS problems are hacks or browser sniffing — and we certainly don’t want to resort to the latter.

Interestingly, there have been a few posts and code snippets floating around that apparently do target IE10 specifically using a hack. Below is a summary of these three techniques, for reference.