Book Giveaway: Think Like a Programmer

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Book Giveaway: Think Like a ProgrammerThe folks over at No Starch press were kind of enough to give me a review copy of one of their new releases Think Like a Programmer by V. Anton Spraul.

Since I didn’t think I could read the book and write a review any time soon, to help them promote what I believe is a valuable book for anyone who solves problems with code, I offered to give away two copies on my site, and they gladly agreed.

Introducing: CSSValues.com

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CSS ValuesThere are quite a few references online for finding detailed info on CSS properties. I find, however, that most of them usually have more than what I’m looking for — and don’t even get me started on the overly-convoluted CSS specs. Truth is, sometimes I just want to know which values are valid for a particular property, and nothing more. So I built a quick-reference site that does just that.

It’s called: CSS Values.

Dropping -ms- Vendor Prefixes for IE10

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Dropping -ms- Vendor Prefixes for IE10The upcoming IE10 will continue to have strong support for a number of CSS3 features and HTML5 APIs.

But if you haven’t yet heard, many of these features will be supported in IE10 unprefixed. These include gradients, animations, transitions, and more.

Parallax Scrolling Scripts and Plugins

Parallax Scrolling Scripts and PluginsParallax scrolling sites have been a pretty hot UX thing of late, being showcased on various blogs. Although the “ooooh! aahhh!”-ness of it all has subsided, I think this type of site is certainly a legitimate design and development option for many brands.

To help you choose a JavaScript or jQuery library or plugin for doing this sort of thing (unless you’re a masochist and want to write one from scratch!), in this post I’ve put together a list of plugins and scripts to choose from.

The Truth About IE10

The Truth About IE10There’s been a lot of talk about IE10, and what it supports, and the great improvements it’s made.

Taking all the latest news into consideration, I summarize my thoughts on this subject in this post.

Sass on Windows with Scout App

Sass on Windows with Scout AppThis is a follow-up post to my previous article, posted yesterday, that discussed how to get up and running with Sass on Windows. At the end of that post I introduced an alternative to all the command-line based instructions.

So here I’ll quickly cover that alternative — Scout App, a free Mac and Windows-based native app produced and maintained by developers at Mutually Human.

Setting Up Sass on Windows

Setting Up Sass on WindowsThere’s a ton of information floating around on preprocessors nowadays. Most of that info is geared towards Mac users, so in this post I’m providing a very simple guide to help Windows-based developers get up and running quickly with Sass (my preprocessor of choice).

Overall, Sass is not difficult at all to get set up, even if you’re doing it on the command-line. But if you have no interest in going through all these steps, but still want to use Sass on Windows, well, just skip to the final heading in this post for a reference to an app that lets you start using Sass on Windows with minimal setup.

Defining the Click Area

Defining the Click AreaWhen you code a button or other clickable element, you need to also define a comfortable click area. Depending on the context and the design, this can sometimes be a challenge. Let’s look at a few examples in a short case study, so we can see the various ways this can be done.

Some navigation bars that I’ve seen are quite paradoxical in the click area they define. Look at the screen shot below showing the main nav bar for WebProNews.