CSS

CSS Tutorials

Animating from “display: block” to “display: none”

Animating display: block to display: noneAs you might already know, CSS3 transitions and animations allow you to animate a specific set of CSS properties. One of the properties that cannot be animated is the display property.

It would be great if we could do it, but it’s not currently possible and I’m guessing it never will be (e.g. how would you animate to “display: table”?). But there are ways to work around it, and I’ll present one way here.

Vertical Percentages in CSS

Vertical Percentages in CSSI don’t think this happens very often. To be honest, I don’t think I’ve ever used a percentage value on a top padding/margin, or a bottom padding/margin value. Even for height values, I may have used a 100% value for a hack, but nothing else.

Nonetheless, using percentages on those vertical parts of a page are somewhat different in the way they are calculated, compared to other properties that take percentage values.

Language-wide Features in CSS

Language-wide Features in CSSIn addition to the unique property/value pairs that CSS offers, there are also a small handful of language-wide features that can come in handy, including a few that are brand new in the spec.

These often go unnoticed, especially by beginners, because when CSS properties and their possible values are discussed (in tutorials, books, or even in the spec), these features are usually omitted for brevity.

The Minimum Code for a CSS Transition

transition-durationHere’s something interesting that you may not have realized about CSS3 transitions. Normally, you’ll see a transition declared by utilizing three different properties, either in longhand or shorthand.

In both cases, we’re explicitly declaring three of the four transition-related properties (leaving out transition-delay). Can a transition occur with less code than that? Well, yes.

Using tabindex with :focus

Tabindex with :focusFor those who have studied web site accessibility, this is probably old hat. Admittedly, I haven’t spent enough time thinking about accessibility, so this is one of those things I didn’t even realize until recently. So shame on me. :)

Let’s say you have the following page, with various elements, starting with maybe a form field:

Quick Tip: Use HTML Comments to Indicate Pseudo-elements

Use HTML Comments to Indicate Pseudo-ElementsAt the recent W3Conf Nicolas Gallagher explained that although pseudo-elements have helped us add decorative content to our pages while keeping our HTML clean, this has led to some maintainability issues.

Developer tools can help to some degree, but oftentimes dynamically added content like pseudo-elements or extra elements added via JavaScript are initially harder to track down.

As Nicolas pointed out, the far-future improvement in this area is the Web Components spec, but I think this is something we can improve on right now.

thatsNotYoChild.js — Fixing Parent-Child Opacity

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Parent/Child signOne of the posts on this website that consistently gets a significant amount of traffic (5000+ page views this month alone) is a ridiculous article I wrote that discusses how to make a child element not inherit the opacity setting of its parent.

As we all know, opacity property can be annoying in this area.

Basically, if a parent element has an opacity value set at, say, 0.5, all of its children will inherit that opacity setting, and there’s no way to reverse that opacity on the child elements.

When to Avoid the Descendant Selector

Descendant Ducks crossingThose of us who have started using modular or object-oriented CSS principles have learned to avoid, as much as possible, the use of the descendant selector (or, more accurately, the descendant combinator).

A selector that uses the descendant combinator looks like this:

IE10 CSS Hacks

IE10 HacksLast year, Microsoft announced that IE10 will not be supporting conditional comments. With their history, this is obviously a risky move. Up to now, to target quirky behaviour in IE6-9, developers have been using conditional comments, conditional classes, and other IE-specific hacks.

But without conditional comments in IE10, the only options we’re left with to target CSS problems are hacks or browser sniffing — and we certainly don’t want to resort to the latter.

Interestingly, there have been a few posts and code snippets floating around that apparently do target IE10 specifically using a hack. Below is a summary of these three techniques, for reference.

Clearing Floats: Why is it Necessary Even in “Modern” Browsers?

Clearing Floats: Why is it Necessary Even in The other day, someone asked me the following question: “If I understand it right clear float is automatic in most modern browsers right?”

If you’re new to CSS, then it would seem that the answer to this question should be “yes, of course — modern browsers don’t have these types of bugs!” But the necessity to clear floats is not a browser bug; it’s actually, well, more of a CSS feature. And it’s still needed in so-called “modern” browsers (assuming you’re using floats for layout).