Web Design Books

This section will feature posts that include reviews, giveaways, and roundups covering various front-end design and development books, magazines, and electronic publications.

A CSS Book for Beginners

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Jump Start CSS BookThis year I had the pleasure of completing my second book, and the first book that I authored all by myself: Jump Start CSS published by SitePoint.

It’s part of their “Jump Start” series of shorter books that provide an introduction to specific web development and design topics.

384 Pages of CSS

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CSS E-BooksDue to the prevalence of ad-blockers, ads as a means to support online content is becoming a less effective method with each passing month.

Selling ads on a blog like this one is not easy, and resorting to backfilling missing ad-spots for ugly Google Ads is less than satisfying. I hope I can one day remove all ads from this website and still continue to produce content regularly.

To begin the process of reaching that goal, I’ve put together 3 CSS E-Books in PDF format containing a collection of CSS-based articles that I’ve published here on this website. Below are links to view a description and table of contents for each e-book:

New Book: HTML5 Boilerplate Web Development

HTML5 Boilerplate BookA couple of weeks ago Packt Publishing contacted me and gave me a free e-book version of Divya Manian’s new book HTML5 Boilerplate Web Development.

For a while now I’ve been wondering who was going to write a book on HTML5 Boilerplate. Although much of what’s in Boilerplate is “plug and play” (i.e., it just works, even if you don’t know what it does), I think many people are intimidated by it and would like a deeper understanding of what’s going on, and what is the optimal way to employ this popular framework. So a book on this topic is a great idea.

Book Giveaway: Think Like a Programmer

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Book Giveaway: Think Like a ProgrammerThe folks over at No Starch press were kind of enough to give me a review copy of one of their new releases Think Like a Programmer by V. Anton Spraul.

Since I didn’t think I could read the book and write a review any time soon, to help them promote what I believe is a valuable book for anyone who solves problems with code, I offered to give away two copies on my site, and they gladly agreed.

3 Books Worth Checking Out for Web App Developers

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3 Books Worth Checking Out for Web App DevelopersI’ve recently been able to get a copy of three books that I thought I’d promote here.

Two of them (from O’Reilly) are relevant to developers who are working on high-end JavaScript-based applications and the other one (from No Starch Press) is a highly regarded book covering the topic of web application security.

Book Giveaway: HTML5 & CSS3 for the Real World

A New Book on HTML5 and CSS3This week I’m swamped with stuff outside of this blog, so I thought it would be a good time for another book giveaway. This time I have two copies of HTML5 & CSS3 for the Real World, published by SitePoint.

As many of you know, this is a book that I helped co-author with Estelle Weyl and Alexis Goldstein. You can read a full description along with table of contents on the SitePoint page linked above.

Book Giveaway: The Book of Ruby

Book Giveaway: The Book of RubyI was unsure of what to write about this week and then I remembered that I had been meaning to post something to promote and give away a hard copy of a book that No Starch Press was kind enough to give me for free.

Below I’ll give you some simple instructions on how you can win my brand new copy of The Book of Ruby by Huw Collingbourne. You’ll never believe what you have to do to qualify for this one! (Note the sarcasm.) But first, a description of the book.

Book Review: Canvas Pocket Reference

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Book Review: Canvas Pocket ReferenceEarlier this year, the folks at O’Reilly were kind enough to send me a review copy of Canvas Pocket Reference: Scripted Graphics for HTML5 by David Flanagan.

Admittedly, this is not a truly legitimate review because, well, I haven’t actually read the entire book. But as you can tell from the title, this is not exactly something you’d read cover to cover and get much out of. I’ve gone through some of it, and since I have no immediate plans to use HTML5’s canvas element or its related API, I probably won’t be referring to it much any time soon.

Nonetheless, there’s good reason for a positive review here.