A JavaScript & DOM E-Book Offer

As many of you know, I publish a weekly newsletter called Web Tools Weekly that’s now gained a pretty nice subscriber base of over 10,000. In addition to the weekly list of categorized tools, each issue usually starts with a brief tutorial or tip, usually something focused on JavaScript and the DOM.

After 80+ issues, I’ve amassed quite a bit of JavaScript- and DOM-focused content. All of that content is available for free in the Web Tools Weekly archives. However, for those who would like to read the tips on a tablet or mobile device, I thought it would be useful to put it together in book form in PDF, EPUB, and MOBI formats. So I’ve just released JavaScript & DOM Tips, Tricks, and Techniques, a collection of 70 tips (125+ pages in PDF), priced at $5.

JavaScript & DOM Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

The tips in the book appear in the same order as they’ve appeared chronologically in the newsletter each week. Although the book was produced through Leanpub, I’m not promoting it for sale via that channel. Leanpub is pretty flexible, so I’m selling it via Pulley, which is an inexpensive and super-simple service for selling digital goods. You can purchase it through Leanpub if you want, but that’s not my preferred channel.

The book uses Leanpub’s default settings for technical material, so it’s very reader-friendly and the code highlighting is really nice. Below is a screenshot from the PDF:

JS & DOM E-Book PDF

And here is one from the EPUB on iOS using scrolling view:

JS & DOM E-Book EPUB

Like I said, all of the content in this e-book is available for free online on the Web Tools Weekly website (aside from some minor corrections and improvements), so the material isn’t new but it’s just packaged in an easier to read format for offline viewing.

Below are the links for the full description of the content and the direct purchase:

2 Responses

  1. Rob Simpson:

    This is awesome and glad that I purchased it. Question I have is would it be good to open source just as Kyle Simpson did with his books to keep it up to date so it can become a published book or book(s)? You seem to continue to add snippets that go above the number listed.

    • I have no plans to do that. I’m not really all that concerned about keeping it up to date. The tips are very brief and I don’t really think they will “go out of date” any time soon. The only way they might not be that useful is if you’re using a library like React or Angular or something. Most of my tips pertain to vanilla JS.

      I’m not sure what you meant by that last thing you said, but I’m not adding tips to the book. The first 70 JS tips that appeared in Web Tools Weekly are included in the first volume but since then, I’ve included about 25+ further tips in the newsletter. Those new tips are not in the book. They will be included in a future volume that I’ve already started compiling.

      I’m guessing that I’ll combine the two books and eventually sell the whole thing (maybe ~150 tips) for a single price (maybe $8). Of course, that might take about 2 more years, so I’ll have to reconsider it at that time, because some of the info will be out of date.

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